CPA

The term CPA is a riddlewrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma.

The term has always troubled me.

 

I took my first CPA exam while still an undergraduate at my professor’s insistence, but I never got my score so apparently undergraduate scores didn’t count. I passed the exam soon after I graduated with half an hour in the AA&Co library to learn governmental accounting. I got my certificate nine months later when I satisfied the experience requirement.

 

The CPA exam was a popular topic of discussion among AA&Co staff, half or more of whom had not passed the exam. Other than that, it wasn’t discussed at all. It was just the price of entry to the accounting profession. Without it you could not very well practice accounting. For those who hadn’t passed it, it was like Damocles sword hanging over their heads.

 

My career progressed into Fortune 500’s, where they didn’t care whether you were a CPA or not. In fact, I never heard it mentioned. Two of my accounting bosses at two different Fortune 500’s did not have their certificate. As my career progressed into the C suite, the subject never came up. And to be perfectly honest, I began to see it as a bit of an impediment, that somehow it pulled me down to their level & degraded me.

 

Later after attempting to buy my Fortune 500 employer, attempting an LBO and running for Congress, the CPA designation came back into focus when I decided to open an accounting practice of my own. I suddenly found myself in an environment where the CPA designation was talked about a lot. In fact it separated the top echelon from the wannabes. If you had a CPA certificate the other CPA thought you walked on water.

 

I had a staff person one time who passed the exam while working for me. He immediately walked into my office and quit to open his own firm. I told him he probably didn’t have enough experience to go out on his own, but that just mad because he had always heard just the opposite. He joined an office sharing arrangement and then just disappeared. That experience had a big influence on my attitude about the CPA designation and on the general intelligence of CPA’s.

 

Over time I dropped the CPA & began calling my company simply ‘Ellis’, rather than the legal title ECPA PC or Ellis CPA Firm PC.

 

But the deciding factor hit yesterday while watching a Youtube video by Dan Pena about creating deal flow. Pena’s tagline is “the Fifty Trillion Dollar man” so he does have some influence and is worth listening to. Pena ridiculed the CPA designation. “People who call themselves CPA’s are doing business out of their bedrooms.” and “Deloitte doesn’t call itself CPA. Ernst & Young doesn’t call itself CPA. PWC doesn’t call itself CPA. Peat Marwick doesn’t call itself CPA.” In fact, out of 2019’s top 100 accounting firms, only four included the term CPA in the name.

 

That brought back memories of a magazine I subscribed to when I first started my practice. The Practical Accountant ran a monthly article of demeaning published comments about CPA’s, who were apparently widely ridiculed across society. The magazine ceased publication years ago, but apparently the attitude they wrote about is still prevalent.

 

So … This morning, I texted the person working on a new logo for Ellis to brand around and told her to nix the CPA. Not that I include it in our online name, but I was going to include it on my updated landing page, but I decided other wise.

It’s very likely that the CPA designation is a net negative in the real world.

Going Virtual & Other Experiences

When the Pandemic hit, we were already paperless & cloud based. We weren’t trying to be PAPERLESS. Nor were we trying to be REMOTE.  We were just trying to stay on the cutting edge of technology.

The first computer I ever saw was at the offices of my Big 5 accounting firm. It was a paper tape job. The second computer I ever saw, I actually mistook for a railroad freight car somehow misplaced into the basement of the high rise my Fortune 500 #254 employer had offices in.  It turned out to be a Burroughs mainframe computer. Burroughs was the big dog in mainframes in those days, but I was disappointed it wasn’t an IBM, the only computer company I had ever heard of. Your watch probably has more computing power than that behemoth. I’m still not certain whether the railroad car housed the computer, or if the railroad car WAS the computer. In any event, every month when the financial statements were printed, all the C Suite executives met in the basement to get the first P&L’s off the printing press. So as a young executive I was hob-nobbing with the CEO, CFO and all the CXO’s of a Fortune 500, about 15 of us in all. Actually, it struck me as foolish to require the entire C Suite (not called that in those days) stand around and watch a dot-matrix printer slowly crank out printed pages. But that’s what we did.

 IBM 360

Later when I was in the C suite of a bankcard company, we had dual IBM 360’s (probably the most successful computer IBM ever built) and later an IBM 370, which didn’t work out as well for us. The computers were sequestered behind glass walls on elevated floors to facilitate air conditioning necessary to keep those powerful computers from melting down to a puddle of plastic & metal.

After leaving the corporate world in the dust and running for Congress, I started my own accounting firm, where I bought two IBM System 3 computers. (My LinkedIn profile provides more info if interested. https://www.linkedin.com/in/elliscpa/)

it took all night to process & print one tax return. If you made a mistake, it took another day. Bookkeeping was more efficient, so we used them for bookkeeping, but we were actually just trying to stay on the front lines of technology innovation. We were certainly the first CPA firm in our city that used computers in any way. As a general rule, the CPA profession did not take quickly to automation. Two decades later I knew CPA’s who were still paper based and using adding machines (I still miss my adding machine.) and shipping off tax returns to be processed at processing centers. To this day, the largest CPA firm in the city I am now located in still provides paper copies of tax returns and charges extra for a digital PDF copy. They bought a building on a major street to increase walk-in traffic.

Today, the software is setting the pace, not the machinery, and certainly not your location. We have clients situated right next door to a CPA firm that uploads everything to us, half way across the country, for us to do their returns.

Everyone in our practice has a computer and two screens, but it’s the software where we outdistance our competitors. When the pandemic hit, we had 12 or 14 computers working with a server. When we got the stay at home order, it took us a day to move everything to Microsoft One Drive, and our server went the way of the horse & buggy. We added Textus & Microsoft Teams and that was it. But we could have done just as well without those new programs. Texting on our phones kept us connected. We hit the ground running & never stopped. When PPP came along. it gave us a boost in work load, but we were so efficient we pumped them all out like we’d been doing them for years. It disappointed us that it took the government quite a long time to decide how to tax them & the terms of forgiveness. If Chinese tanks pulled in front of their building, it would take them two weeks to decide what to do.

The biggest problem we had as dealing with 10-15 people scattered around the country without just walking down the hall and asking. It wasn’t that we weren’t communicating, it was that we were communicating too much. Everyone could text & call everyone else. We also had text groups for the Tax Team, The accounting & payroll team and the entire Ellis Team. Every time a message comes in I get a beep to alert me. Textus & Microsoft Teams also alert you to incoming messages. I remember one morning sitting in my home office listening to the messages come in. It sounded like a machine gun going off, and I knew I had to read every single one of them.

Our biggest problem was the communication was too efficient. Who would have thought? We may be unique, but everyone was closely connected and missed everyone, so they communicated back & forth about everything.

That’s our story, but we know for a fact, that was not everyone’s story. I have a family member that works for Spectrum, a local wifi provider. He said they were busy setting up offices at home for CPA’s. I have also stumbled across things on the web here and there about how CPA’s did not do well in the Pandemic. There were a lot of businesses that failed during pandemic, fortunately none of our clients. Those failures came from someone’s practice. But no one of them is willing to say, “We fell apart during pandemic.”

Observations.

To this day, months into this thing, most businesses are not back to full staff.  Some of them still won’t let customers in their business. Every business that does is much less crowded than they used to be. Their business has to be off by half, or more. Nor are they stocked as well. Where I live, nearly every used car lot has gone out of business, and many restaurants. Before all this is over, more will fail. This is contrary to our experience. Our business actually increased during pandemic. What is everyone else not doing that we did?

Overall, the marketplace is moving backward, not forward. There is still a movement not to reopen schools, and I just got a notice on my phone that Sam’s is going to require masks again starting next week. My supermarket required masks two days ago. And where I live, nothing out of the ordinary going on.

Just between you & me, this is completely bullxxit. There are a lot of states reporting increased infections, but the fatality rate is lower than the ordinary flu. Plus there’s apparently some fraudulent reporting. In my opinion, this entire cluster-flux was politically motivated. If we can ever prove that, hundreds or thousands will go to the guillotine. I can’t wait.

Reorganization

Here is a summary of the entities most commonly used in business. There are actually something like 30 entities people can operate businesses in. These are five are commonly used.

 

1-Schedule C self-employed with no credit protection. Owners can be sued individually.

 

2-Partnership with no credit protection. Owners can be sued individually. Those have been around since the time of Christ.

 

3-Corporation with limited liability. Widely known as a C corp because it‘s taxed according to Chapter C of the Internal Revenue code. Owners cannot be sued for unpaid business costs. This came on the scene in 1700 when investors had a need for liability limits to raise large amounts of money. The initial purpose was to create the East India Company that governed India & half of China for two centuries. This was by far the biggest & most profitable economic enterprise ever. The corporation is the only entity that pays income tax directly to the government.

 

3-S Corporation with limited Liability. A C corporation which elects to be taxed as a flow though organization that pushes out profits & losses to be reported on the owner’s tax returns. Commonly known as an S corp. Taxed under subchapter S of the Internal Revenue Code. Profits & losses flow through to the owners and are reported on their tax personal tax returns. That’s why you will sometimes hear the terminology “flow through companies” for entities that don’t pay tax directly to the government. Corporations & LLC’s commonly elect to be taxed as an S corp. This does not affect their legal protection. S corps are limited to 100 owners. That’s why all the big companies such as General Motors and Amazon are C corps. After 300 years all states have come to agreement on how to tax corporations & S corporations.

 

4-LLC with limited liability. This came on the scene in 1971. Owners cannot be sued individually as long as there are two or more owners. There is still disagreement on how LLC’s should be taxed by states. Wyoming created the LLC in 1977 to satisfy a demand for a partnership with limited liability. It has the same structure as a partnership and files taxes on the same tax return, but it has limited liability as long as there are two or more members. Owners are referred to as partners in a partnership, & as members in an LLC. LLC’s commonly elect to be taxed as an S corporation. It is a toss-up whether S corp’s or an LLC’s are the most popular business form in the U.S.

 

5-C Corporations with limited liability. Corporations have been around since 1700 and the law is basically settled. In every state corporations are treated essentially identically. LLC’s are relatively new (50 years) and the states have not yet come to agreement how they will be treated. In some states they are treated well, and in other states they are not a good alternative. We create most new LLC’s under WY law, South Dakota or Nevada because those state have charging orders that make an LLC almost bullet proof against lawsuit or collection activity of any kind.  Nevada also has charging orders for corporations.

 

For most small businesses an S corp or an LLC with an election to be taxed as an S corp are the best entities. Each of these four entities are subject to different tax treatment and can deduct different expenses on their tax returns.

 

The state you organize is also extremely important. Wyoming, Nevada & South Dakota are probably the three best states to organize in, but the type of entity also plays a determining role in the selection. Also, there is kind of a civil war among states competing for being the Delaware for pirvately owned businesses. Every year someone drops a delightful goodie in our lap. But, remember this … you should never just organize in the state where you are located. But, as you can tell, that’s a post for another time.

 

A significant part of our practice is determining the proper combination to use to incur the least amount of tax.

CFO Services

A virtual CFO (Chief Financial Officer) is an investment in the growth of your company. As every business grows, something happens. The more they grow, the more background, bureaucratic chores consume your time. If you don’t get control of this trend, it will eventually swamp your business & your dreams along with it. Outsourcing frees your time to focus on achieving key core business goals and planning. We pull the busy work off your plate.

This is why you went into business in the first place instead of just getting a job. We pull the hated, boring, tedious but necessary functions off your hands and give them to people on our staff that love doing it. Believe it or not, there are people who love doing it. You don’t love doing it. You should fire yourself and hire us. That will make us both happy.

In addition, our qualified CFO talent is available for advice & CFO consultation. He or she is a crucial member of your strategy team. 

We have significant experience as CFO with Fortune 500 companies. 

Virtual Chief Financial Officer

CFO is an outsourced service provider offering high skill assistance in financial & administrative requirements of an organization, just like a chief financial officer & his staff do for large organizations.

Ellis experienced CFOs, executives, accountants & tax professionals perform administrative, accounting & payroll functions can help owners, management, and board members solve financial management & operational issues by providing unique guidance and advice. See business services.

You can depend on experienced, high-level professionals to provide the financial insights you need to meet the challenges you face. We provide all the back room services you need; as well as advice, explanations & recommendations.

    • Financial strategy
    • Short & long term forecasting
    • Financial systems strategy & design
    • Budgeting
    • Projections
    • Facilitating & supporting financial reporting
    • Raising capital
    • Interim CFO services
    • Cash flow analysis & restructuring
    • Renegotiating vendor contracts
    • Restructuring client contracts
    • Ensuring pricing is aligned with company & industry trends
    • Analyzing commission structures
    • Supply chain management
    • Attributing costs to revenues
    • Accounting & bookkeeping
    • Payroll
    • Financial Statement
    • Bill pay
    • Collections
    • Data driven management
    • Capture & interpret critical operating data
    • CFO service
    • Streamline & simplify
    • Cash management
    • Remote office
    • Management financial statements
    • Compiled financial statements

Is Your Tax Accountant Helping or Hindering?

If you’re like most businesses, you don’t see accounting firms as an integral part of your success. You’re more likely to see them as a third wheel; a necessary cost that never contributes a dime to the bottom line.

That’s certainly not the ideal situation.

Here’s the scenario you should aim for.

In little more than a decade, Apple pulled itself from the brink of bankruptcy and propelled itself to the most valuable company in the world by cutting taxes & weeding out waste. Both of these are accounting functions. Apple funded that explosion in growth partly by saving $400 billion in taxes, partly by weeding out the waste that nearly drove them into bankruptcy, and partly with the iPod, the iPhone & the iPad.

This is the ideal relationship to expect from your accounting firm.

You can add competitive advantage out of thin air without spending an extra dime just by hiring the right accounting firm. The right firm will save you money, and every dollar saved puts distance between you and your competitors.

Read more about Apple Tax here: http://www.elliscpa.us/apples-tax-strategy/

Read about Ellis here: http://www.elliscpa.us/about/.

Call us and we can discuss what we can do for you.

Holy Cow Said the Deaf Man

Tesco Faces U.K. Criminal Investigation of Accounting Practices
by SUZI RING

U.K. prosecutors open investigation into grocery chain’s $424 million profit-guidance overstatement, the first sign the accounting problems are being considered a criminal matter.
READ MORE »

Well, it’s time to start worrying if your in house accountants are up to the task. We have numerous clients who would fare much better if they outsourced their accounting function to us. However, our entreaties fall upon deaf ears.

Looking At Every Angle

Looking At Every Angle
Most closely held businesses are unwilling to pay for anything but the bare minimum. An example is analytics. Despite the fact that analytics can deliver insights to your business that will drive profits higher, few closely held businesses are willing make the investment necessary.
 
That’s why the vast majority of closely held businesses will never leave a mark on the universe.
 
Contrast that to large publicly held businesses. It is not uncommon for publicly held companies to have consultants from two or three firms on their premises every single day of the year. They overspend on this. But they try to be sure they have considered every single angle.  That’s why they’re big and you’re not.
Ellis analytic accounting is not exorbitantly priced. It is well within reach for any closely help business.  
The downside is small, but the upside is large.
www.strategyfactory.us